Farmers, Fairness & the Farm Bill

where issues of producers, policy and equity converge

A Collaborative Research Project with Rural Coalition, National Family Farm Coalition & American University's School of International Service (Washington, DC)

Research Teams

Practicum teams are annual cohorts of graduate students working on their capstone for the Masters degree at American University’s School of International Service. Undergraduate American University students also contribute to research and the website, including students working on independent studies and students in the Community Based Research Scholars program.


2017 Practicum team

 
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In the 2017 U.S. Agricultural Policy Practicum at American University,  rather than work on several separate individual or small group projects as past practicum classes had done, the students and Professor Graddy-Lovelace  opted for a more collaborative approach of producing only two larger group reports . These reports were mostly worked on separately by two different teams but were also tied together through a shared focus on how U.S. policy has favored certain groups within the food system and a certain type of agriculture to the detriment of the majority of U.S. farms and farmers—especially those farms and farmers that do not fit the mold of large-scale industrial agriculture headed by white males. 

Click here for Report #1 — Producing Poverty: Assessing the Impact of Federal Policy and Farm Bill Programs on Rural Communities

The first report analyzes political economic and socio-political aspects of U.S. agricultural policy and is supported with field work conducted with community partners in Iowa, Oklahoma and Washington, D.C.

  • Topics covered: trade, farm safety net programs (crop insurance and others), race in agriculture and black land loss, the U.S. rural crisis, food sovereignty

Click here for Report #2 — The Ecological Cost of Discrimination: A Case Study of Rural Farmers in Oklahoma

The second report analyzes the Farm Bill's conservation and sustainable agriculture programs and uses  original research from Oklahoma as case study to exemplify how the legacy of discrimination against certain groups of farmers  not only makes those farmers more vulnerable to environmental risks, but also has ecological consequences that are relevant to all of rural Oklahoma. 

  • Topics covered: climate change and agriculture, race in agriculture, agroecology

2016 Practicum team

 Entire 2016 Practicum Team

Entire 2016 Practicum Team

 G. Ryan Siegel, graduate of American University School of International Service with an M.A. in International Economic Relations, focusing on financial economics.

G. Ryan Siegel, graduate of American University School of International Service with an M.A. in International Economic Relations, focusing on financial economics.

 Leticia C. Donoso, graduate of American University School of International Service, with a M.A. in International Economic Relations. Areas of interest: international trade, development, social protection, and impact evaluation.

Leticia C. Donoso, graduate of American University School of International Service, with a M.A. in International Economic Relations. Areas of interest: international trade, development, social protection, and impact evaluation.

 Nicholas Anderson is a graduate from the School of International Service, American University with an M.A. in Global Environmental Policy. Areas of academic interest: natural resource management, sustainable landscapes and livelihoods, drug policy and social enterprise.

Nicholas Anderson is a graduate from the School of International Service, American University with an M.A. in Global Environmental Policy. Areas of academic interest: natural resource management, sustainable landscapes and livelihoods, drug policy and social enterprise.

 Jeff Eversman, graduate of American University with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Areas of interest: international trade, German and European economic and geopolitical affairs.

Jeff Eversman, graduate of American University with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Areas of interest: international trade, German and European economic and geopolitical affairs.

 Tetyana Sydorenko, graduate of American University School of International Service, with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Concentration: International Finance

Tetyana Sydorenko, graduate of American University School of International Service, with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Concentration: International Finance

 Tetyana Sydorenko, graduate of American University School of International Service, with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Concentration: International Finance

Tetyana Sydorenko, graduate of American University School of International Service, with an M.A. in International Economic Relations. Concentration: International Finance

 

2015 Practicum team

 Renata Aguilera-Titus, International Communications MA '15

Renata Aguilera-Titus, International Communications MA '15

 Kat Diersen, Global Environmental Policy MA '15

Kat Diersen, Global Environmental Policy MA '15

 Anna Aspenson, Public Health BA '15

Anna Aspenson, Public Health BA '15

 Michael Bard, Global Environmental Policy MA '15

Michael Bard, Global Environmental Policy MA '15

 Emmy Grace, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '15

Emmy Grace, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '15

 Karis McGill, International Development MA '15

Karis McGill, International Development MA '15

 Kiersten Rooke, International Development MA '15

Kiersten Rooke, International Development MA '15

 Sara Servin, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '15

Sara Servin, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '15

Not pictured:

Anna Claire Eddington, International Training and Education MA '15

Leah Germer, Global Environmental Policy MA '15

Jessie Krafft, International Development MA '15

Juan Osuna, Comparative and Regional Studies MA '15

Stephen Tolpinrud, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development MA '15


2014 Practicum Team

 Emmalee Aman, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

Emmalee Aman, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

 Alyssa Viars, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

Alyssa Viars, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

 Kelley Cressman, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

Kelley Cressman, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

 Anna Meyer, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14

Anna Meyer, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14

 Arielle Conti, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

Arielle Conti, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

 Forrest McGraw, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

Forrest McGraw, Global Environmental Politics MA '14

 Jamie Pratt, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14

Jamie Pratt, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14

 Jes Walton, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14

Jes Walton, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '14


2013 Practicum Team

 Sarah Howell, Global Environmental Politics MA '13

Sarah Howell, Global Environmental Politics MA '13

 David Golding, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

David Golding, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

 Erica Christensen, Global Environmental Politics MA '13

Erica Christensen, Global Environmental Politics MA '13

 Cameron Harsh, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

Cameron Harsh, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

 Elise Szabo, International Development MA '13

Elise Szabo, International Development MA '13

 Casey Harrison, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

Casey Harrison, Natural Resources & Sustainable Development MA '13

 
 

Community based research scholars

The Community Based Research Scholars (CBRS) program is a first-year living-learning community for selected undergraduate first-years at American University, emphasizing responsible and meaningful service learning through community-based research opportunities. CBR Scholars work with a network of students, faculty, and community partners to help identify avenues to affect social change.

In spring of 2018, the CBRS class teamed up with DC Hunger Solutions, an organization that fights hunger and improves the nutrition, health, economic security, and well-being of low-income District residents, to frame the problem of hunger with data. They completed research on different areas regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program( SNAP).

Find the deliverables from the CBRS 2018 cohort here.


INDEPENDENT STUDIES

 Mel Friedel is an undergraduate senior pursuing a B.S. in Environmental Science in American University’s College of Arts and Sciences, graduating in ‘19. For her independent study, she created and writes for the  Agri-Culture blog.

Mel Friedel is an undergraduate senior pursuing a B.S. in Environmental Science in American University’s College of Arts and Sciences, graduating in ‘19. For her independent study, she created and writes for the Agri-Culture blog.

 

Community partnered action research on and for U.S. agricultural policy

www.farmbillfairness.org